release notes | UserGuide: 4.2, 5.0, 5.1, 5.2, 6.0, 6.1, 6.2 (unreleased) | Book: 4.2, 5.0, 5.1, 5.2, 6.0, 6.1, 6.2 (unreleased) | Wiki | Q&A black_bg
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Specialized NFS Dot Commands

The following commands provide information concerning a file’s locality, checksums and storage location.

GET LOCALITY

Returns the media types on which the file is currently stored.

USAGE:

cat ".(get)(<filename>)(locality)"

RETURNS:

  • ONLINE: stored on disk
  • NEARLINE: requires staging or data replication before open succeeds
  • ONLINE_AND_NEARLINE: stored both on disk and tape
  • UNAVAILABLE: not stored on any media (i.e., lost)

EXAMPLE:

$ cat ".(get)(test_file-Thu_Oct_23_10:39:37_CDT_2014-109)(locality)"
$ ONLINE_AND_NEARLINE

NOTES:

Currently, the NFS client sends ‘localhost’ to the poolmanager as its hostname (the protocol match defaults to ‘/’). SRM does something similar. In the future this may be modified to send the actual IP address of the client.

There are no guarantees concerning future availability of the file; in particular, ONLINE_AND_NEARLINE may revert back to NEARLINE at any time unless the file is pinned.


GET CHECKSUM TYPES

Get the valid / recognized checksum types for dCache.

USAGE:

cat ".(checksums)()"
RETURNS:

A new-line delimited list of checksum type names.

EXAMPLE:
$ cat ".(checksums)()"
ADLER32
MD5
MD4

GET CHECKSUM(S)

Get checksum types and checksums for a given file.

USAGE:

cat ".(get)(<filename>)(checksum[s])"
RETURNS:

A comma-delimited list of type:value pairs for all checksums stored in the database.

EXAMPLE:
$ cat ".(get)(test_file-Thu_Oct_23_10:39:37_CDT_2014-109)(checksums)"
$ ADLER32:66300001

SET CHECKSUM

Set a checksum value for a file. An ordinary user can only set one checksum (type, value) pair, and cannot overwrite existing values. A ROOT user is allowed to set multiple types (successively) and also to overwrite values for any type.

USAGE:

touch ".(fset)(<filename>)(checksum)(<type>)(<value>)"
EXAMPLES:
[arossi@otfrid volatile]$ touch testfile

[arossi@otfrid volatile]$ cat ".(get)(testfile)(checksum)"

[arossi@otfrid volatile]$ touch ".(fset)(testfile)(checksum)(ADLER32)(ffffffff)"

[arossi@otfrid volatile]$ cat ".(get)(testfile)(checksum)"
ADLER32:ffffffff

[arossi@otfrid volatile]$ touch ".(fset)(testfile)(checksum)(ADLER32)(fffffff0)"
touch: setting times of ‘.(fset)(testfile)(checksum)(ADLER32)(fffffff0)’: Operation not permitted

[arossi@otfrid volatile]$ ksu
Authenticated arossi@FNAL.GOV
Account root: authorization for arossi@FNAL.GOV successful
Changing uid to root (0)

[root@otfrid volatile]# touch ".(fset)(testfile)(checksum)(ADLER32)(fffffff0)"

[root@otfrid volatile]# cat ".(get)(testfile)(checksum)"
ADLER32:fffffff0

[root@otfrid volatile]# touch ".(fset)(testfile)(checksum)(MD5)(12341234123412345678567856785678)"

[root@otfrid volatile]# cat ".(get)(testfile)(checksum)"
ADLER32:fffffff0, MD5:12341234123412345678567856785678

GET PIN(S)

Get pins on a given file.

USAGE:

cat ".(get)(<filename>)(pins)"
RETURNS:

A simple table of information about pins. Each pin is represented by a row in the table. Each row has the following information, separated by the tab character:

  • The (dCache internal) numerical ID for this pin.
  • When the pin was requested in ISO 8601 format.
  • If the pin will be removed automatically, when this will happen, in ISO 8601 format; or ‘-’ if the pin will not be remove automatically.
  • The description in quote marks for this pin, if any, otherwise the ‘-’ character.
  • Whether you can remove this pin: REMOVABLE if you can, NONREMOVABLE otherwise.
  • The current status of this pin: either PINNING, PINNED or UNPINNING.

The PINNING status indicates the pin request was accepted but the file is not yet guaranteed with ONLINE latency. The PINNED state indicates the file has ONLINE latency. The UNPINNING state indicates this pin no longer guarantees ONLINE latency, but additional clean-up processing is ongoing.

EXAMPLES:

Response when a file has no pins:

cat ".(get)(my-file.dat)(pins)"

Response showing a file has two pins in state PINNING:

cat ".(get)(my-file.dat)(pins)"
|3       2019-08-11T07:33:30.822Z        2019-08-11T07:35:30.830Z        -       NONREMOVABLE    PINNED
|4       2019-08-11T07:33:36.946Z        2019-08-11T07:35:36.960Z        -       REMOVABLE       PINNED

PIN/STAGE

Allows users to pin or stage files.

USAGE:
touch ".(fset)(<filename>)(<operation>)(<duration>)(<unit>)"
OPTIONS:

operation can be replaced by:

  • pin
  • stage
  • bringonline
  • unpin

The first three are equivalent options.

duration must be 0 or a positive integer: 0 will unpin all pins for which you are authorised to remove, a positive integer will create a new pin with that duration.

For pin, stage and bringonline, this argument is optional and defaults to 300 (seconds), or 5 minutes.

unpin takes no arguments and is equivalent to pin 0.

unit can be replaced by:

  • SECONDS
  • MINUTES
  • HOURS
  • DAYS

This argument is optional and defaults to SECONDS.

USAGE:

A pin is a promise from dCache to store the file on a low-latency device, such as a disk. This is useful if the file would otherwise be stored only on a low-latency device (such as tape) or (for a distributed dCache deployment) at a remote location.

There are two steps: creating the pin and fulfilling the pin. This touch command is the first step, which triggers the processing necessary for the second step.

If dCache did not accept the pin request (due to some internal error) then the dCache NFS server will respond with an NFSERR_INVAL error. The behaviour of the NFS client is implementation specific, but for a Linux mounted filesystem, this is presented as an error; e.g.,

touch '.(fset)(test_file-1.dat)(pin)(60)'
|touch: setting times of '.(fset)(test_file-1.dat)(pin)(60)': Invalid argument
echo $?
|1

If the touch command is successful then no error is returned and the return-code is zero:

touch '.(fset)(test_file-1.dat)(pin)(60)'
echo $?
|0

The .(get)(<filename>)(pins) dot command may be used to track the pins progress. The pin’s is initially in state PINNING, but will change to state PINNED once the pin has been fulfilled.

You may use a zero duration to remove all pins for which you are authorised. You can remove all pins you created and pins created by someone with a primary group of which you are also a member.

Immediately after removing a pin, it has state UNPINNING. Once all processing has completed, the pin will disappear from the pin list.

EXAMPLES:

Pin file for 30 seconds:

touch ".(fset)(test_file-1.dat)(pin)(30)"

Pin file for two minutes:

touch ".(fset)(test_file-1.dat)(pin)(2)(MINUTES)"

Remove all pins on the file:

touch ".(fset)(test_file-1.dat)(pin)(0)"

For further explanation of pinning, see Pinning Files to a Pool.


GET/SET TAPE LOCATION URI

Stores, retrieves and modifies the URI string(s) which define an HSM/tape location. A normal user can read and write once to this file. Root can overwrite and append as well.

USAGE:
cat ".(suri)(<file name>)"
echo [...] > ".(suri)(<file name>)"
echo [...] >> ".(suri)(<file name>)"
RETURNS:
cat will return a list of locations (there may be multiple ones).
EXAMPLE:
$ cat ".(suri)(data001)"
$ enstore://enstore/?volume=VOL001&location_cookie=0000_000000000_0000001&size=234653&file_family=standard&map_file=&
   pnfsid_file=0000464E839DEAFC428E8CF52D8028455141&pnfsid_map=&bfid=c085615502758c8bb54db4c30081626f&
   origdrive=localhost:/dev/tmp/tps0d0n:1487271284&crc=813392028&original_name=/pnfs/fs/usr/test/arossi/000/data001

### overwrite (cookie) [as root]

$ echo "enstore://enstore/?volume=VOL001&location_cookie=0000_000000000_0000002&size=234653&file_family=standard&
   map_file=&pnfsid_file=0000464E839DEAFC428E8CF52D8028455141&pnfsid_map=&bfid=c085615502758c8bb54db4c30081626f&
   origdrive=localhost:/dev/tmp/tps0d0n:1487271284&crc=813392028&original_name=/pnfs/fs/usr/test/arossi/000/data001"
   > ".(suri)(data001)"

$ cat ".(suri)(data001)"
$ enstore://enstore/?volume=VOL001&location_cookie=0000_000000000_0000002&size=234653&file_family=standard&map_file=&
   pnfsid_file=0000464E839DEAFC428E8CF52D8028455141&pnfsid_map=&bfid=c085615502758c8bb54db4c30081626f&
   origdrive=localhost:/dev/tmp/tps0d0n:1487271284&crc=813392028&original_name=/pnfs/fs/usr/test/arossi/000/data001

### append (cookie) [as root]

$ echo "enstore://enstore/?volume=VOL001&location_cookie=0000_000000000_0000003&size=234653&file_family=standard&
   map_file=&pnfsid_file=0000464E839DEAFC428E8CF52D8028455141&pnfsid_map=&bfid=c085615502758c8bb54db4c30081626f&
   origdrive=localhost:/dev/tmp/tps0d0n:1487271284&crc=813392028&original_name=/pnfs/fs/usr/test/arossi/000/data001"
   > ".(suri)(data001)"

$ cat ".(suri)(data001)"
$ enstore://enstore/?volume=VOL001&location_cookie=0000_000000000_0000002&size=234653&file_family=standard&map_file=&
   pnfsid_file=0000464E839DEAFC428E8CF52D8028455141&pnfsid_map=&bfid=c085615502758c8bb54db4c30081626f&
   origdrive=localhost:/dev/tmp/tps0d0n:1487271284&crc=813392028&original_name=/pnfs/fs/usr/test/arossi/000/data001,
   enstore://enstore/?volume=VOL001&location_cookie=0000_000000000_0000003&size=234653&file_family=standard&map_file=&
   pnfsid_file=0000464E839DEAFC428E8CF52D8028455141&pnfsid_map=&bfid=c085615502758c8bb54db4c30081626f&
   origdrive=localhost:/dev/tmp/tps0d0n:1487271284&crc=813392028&original_name=/pnfs/fs/usr/test/arossi/000/data001

### remove [as root]

$ echo -n "" > ".(suri)(data001)"

$ cat ".(suri)(data001)"
$
NOTES:

We record here a peculiar problem concerning permission error reporting using bash built-in ‘echo’.

Simple overwrite reports the error correctly:

$ echo -n "" > ".(suri)(data001)"
-bash: .(suri)(data001): Operation not permitted

Append, however, does not:

$ echo "[...]" >> ".(suri)(data001)"
$ echo $?
0
$ cat ".(suri)(data001)"
[shows the original location]

Note that the behavior is correct (the new location value has not been overwritten), but the return value for the process is 0, and no error is reported.

The executable [/usr]/bin/echo, however, works as it should:

$ /bin/echo  "[...]" >> ".(suri)(data001)"
/bin/echo: write error: Operation not permitted

This is also works properly in python.

A similar issue arises with errors involving invalid URIs: built-in echo does not report the error, but /bin/echo and python do.